Landmark Computers - Bitcoin South Africa

hahhaa doom go brrrr

The date was June 10, 2018. The sun was shining, the grass was growing, and the birds were singing. At least, that’s what I assumed. Being a video game and tech obsessed teenager, I was indoors, my eyes glued to my computer monitor like a starving lion spying on a plump gazelle. I was watching the E3 (Electronic Entertainment Expo) 2018 broadcast on twitch.com, a popular streaming website. Video game developers use E3 as an annual opportunity to showcase any upcoming video game projects to the public. So far, the turnout had been disappointing. Much to my disappointment, multiple game developers failed to unveil anything of actual sustenance for an entire two hours. A graphical update here, a bug fix there. Issues that should have been fixed at every game’s initial launch, not a few months after release. Feeling hopeless, I averted my eyes from my computer monitor to check Reddit (a social media app/website) if there were any forum posts that I had yet to see. But then, I heard it. The sound of music composer Mick Gordon’s take on the original “DooM” theme, the awesome combination of metal and electronic music. I looked up at my screen and gasped. Bethesda Softworks and id software had just announced “DOOM: Eternal”, the fifth addition in the “DooM” video game series. “DOOM: Eternal” creative director Hugo Martin promised that the game would feel more powerful than it’s 2016 predecessor, there would be twice as many enemy types, and the doom community would finally get to see “hell on earth”. (Martin) As a fan of “DOOM (2016)”, I was ecstatic. The original “DooM” popularized the “First Person Shooter (FPS)” genre, and I wished I wouldn’t have to wait to experience the most recent entry in the series. “DOOM(1993)” was a graphical landmark when it originally released, yet nowadays it looks extremely dated, especially compared to “DOOM: Eternal”. What advancements in computer technology perpetuated this graphical change? Computers became faster, digital storage increased, and computer peripherals were able to display higher resolution and refresh rates.
“DooM” 1993 graphics example:
📷(Doom | Doom Wiki)
“DOOM: Eternal” graphics example:
📷
(Bailey)
In their video “Evolution Of DOOM”, the video game YouTube Channel “gameranx” says that on December 10, 1993, a file titled “DOOM1_0.zip” was uploaded on the File Transfer Protocol (FTP) server of the University of Wisconsin. This file, two megabytes in size, contained the video game “DooM” created by the game development group “id Software”. (Evolution of DOOM) While not the first game in the “First Person Shooter” (FPS) genre, “DooM” popularized the genre, to the point of any other FPS game being referred to as a “Doom Clone” until the late 1990s. (Doom clones | Doom Wiki) The graphics of the original “DooM” is definitely a major downgrade compared to today’s graphical standards, but keep in mind that the minimum system requirements of “DooM”, according to the article “Doom System Requirements” on gamesystemrequirements.com, was eight megabytes of ram, an Intel Pentium or AMD (Advanced Micro Devices) Athlon 486 processor cycling at sixty-six megahertz or more, and an operating system that was Windows 95 or above. (Doom System Requirements) In case you don’t speak the language of technology (although I hope you learn a thing or two at the end of this essay), the speed and storage capacity is laughable compared to the specifications of today. By 1993, the microprocessor, or CPU (Central Processing Unit) had been active for the past twenty-two years after replacing the integrated circuit in 1971, thanks to the creators of the microprocessor, Robert Noyce and Gordon Moore who were also the founder of CPU manufacturer “Intel”. Gordon Moore also created “Moore’s law”, which states “The number of transistors incorporated in a chip will approximately double every 24 months”. (Moore) Sadly, according to writer and computer builder Steve Blank in his article “The End of More - The Death of Moore’s Law”, this law would end at around 2005, thanks to the basic laws of physics. (Blank) 1993 also marked an important landmark for Intel, who just released the first “Pentium” processor which was capable of a base clock of 60 MHz (megahertz). The term “base clock” refers to the default speed of a CPU. This speed can be adjusted via the user’s specifications, and “MHz” refers to one million cycles per second. A cycle is essentially one or more problems that the computer solves. The more cycles the CPU is running at, the more problems get solved. Intel would continue upgrading their “Pentium” lineup until January 4, 2000 when they would release the “Celeron” processor, with a base clock of 533 MHz. Soon after, on June 19, 2000, rival CPU company AMD would release their “Duron” processor which had a base clock of 600 MHz, with a maximum clock of 1.8 GHz (Gigahertz). One GHz is equal to 1,000 MHz. Intel and AMD had established themselves as the two major CPU companies in the 1970s in Silicon Valley. Both companies had been bitter rivals since then, trading figurative blows in the form of competitive releases, discounts, and “one upmanship” to this day. Moving on to April 21, 2005 when AMD released the first dual-core CPU, the “Athlon 64 X2 3800+”. The notable feature of this CPU, besides a 2.0 GHz base clock and a 3.8 maximum clock, was that it was the first CPU to have two cores. A CPU core is a CPU’s processor. The more cores a CPU has, the more tasks it can perform per cycle, thus maximizing it’s efficiency. Intel wouldn’t respond until January 9, 2006, when they released their dual-core processor, the “Core 2 Duo Processor E6320”, with a base clock of 1.86 GHz. (Computer Processor History) According to tech entrepreneur Linus Sebastian in his YouTube videos “10 Years of Gaming PCs: 2009 - 2014 (Part 1)” and “10 Years of Gaming PCs: 2015 - 2019 (Part 2)”, AMD would have the upper hand over Intel until 2011, when Intel released the “Sandy Bridge” CPU microarchitecture, which was faster and around the same price as AMD’s current competing products. (Sebastian) The article “What is Microarchitecture?” on the website Computer Hope defines microarchitecture as “a hardware implementation of an ISA (instruction set architecture). An ISA is a structure of commands and operations used by software to communicate with hardware. A microarchitecture is the hardware circuitry that implements one particular ISA”. (What is Microarchitecture?) Microarchitecture is also referred to as what generation a CPU belongs to. Intel would continue to dominate the high-end CPU market until 2019, when AMD would “dethrone” Intel with their third generation “Ryzen” CPU lineup. The most notable of which being the “Ryzen 3950x”, which had a total of sixteen cores, thirty-two threads, a base clock of 3.5 GHz, and a maximum clock of 4.7 GHz. (Sebastian) The term “thread” refers to splitting one core into virtual cores, via a process known as “simultaneous multithreading”. Simultaneous multithreading allows one core to perform two tasks at once. What CPU your computer has is extremely influential for how fast your computer can run, but for video games and other types of graphics, there is a special type of processor that is designed specifically for the task of “rendering” (displaying) and generating graphics. This processor unit is known as the graphics processing unit, or “GPU”. The term “GPU” wasn’t used until around 1999, when video cards started to evolve beyond the literal generation of two-dimensional graphics and into the generation of three-dimensional graphics. According to user “Olena” in their article “A Brief History of GPU”, The first GPU was the “GeForce 256”, created by GPU company “Nvidia'' in 1999. Nvidia promoted the GeForce 256 as “A single-chip processor with integrated transform, lighting, triangle setup/clipping, and rendering engines that is capable of processing a minimum of 10 million polygons per second”. (Olena) Unlike the evolution of CPUs, the history of GPUs is more one sided, with AMD playing a game of “catchup” ever since Nvidia overtook AMD in the high-end GPU market in 2013. (Sebastian) Fun fact, GPUs aren’t used only for gaming! In 2010, Nvidia collaborated with Audi to power the dashboards and increase the entertainment and navigation systems in Audi’s cars! (Olena) Much to my (and many other tech enthusiasts), GPUs would increase dramatically in price thanks to the “bitcoin mania” around 2017. This was, according to senior editor Tom Warren in his article “Bitcoin Mania is Hurting PC Gamers By Pushing Up GPU Prices'' on theverge.com, around an 80% increase in price for the same GPU due to stock shortages. (Warren) Just for context, Nvidia’s “flagship” gpu in 2017 was the 1080ti, the finest card of the “pascal” microarchitecture. Fun fact, I have this card. The 1080ti launched for $699, with the specifications of a base clock of 1,481 MHz, a maximum clock of 1,582 MHz, and 11 gigabytes of GDDR5X Vram (Memory that is exclusive to the GPU) according to the box it came in. Compare this to Nvidia’s most recent flagship GPU, the 2080ti of Nvidia’s followup “Turing” microarchitecture, another card I have. This GPU launched in 2019 for $1,199. The 2080ti’s specifications, according to the box it came in included a base clock of 1,350 MHz, a maximum clock of 1,545 MHz, and 11 gigabytes of GDDR6 Vram.
A major reason why “DooM” was so popular and genius was how id software developer John Carmack managed to “fake” the three-dimensional graphics without taking up too much processing power, hard drive space, or “RAM” (Random access memory), a specific type of digital storage. According to the article “RAM (Random Access Memory) Definition” on the website TechTerms, Ram is also known as “volatile” memory, because it is much faster than normal storage (which at the time took the form of hard-drive space), and unlike normal storage, only holds data when the computer is turned on. A commonly used analogy is that Ram is the computer’s short-term memory, storing temporary files to be used by programs, while hard-drive storage is the computer’s long term memory. (RAM (Random Access Memory) Definition) As I stated earlier, in 1993, “DooM” required 8 megabytes of ram to run. For some context, as of 2020, “DOOM: Eternal” requires a minimum of 8 gigabytes of DDR4 (more on this later) ram to run, with most gaming machines possessing 16 gigabytes of DDR4 ram. According to tech journalist Scott Thornton in his article “What is DDR (Double Data Rate) Memory and SDRAM Memory”, in 1993, the popular format of ram was “SDRAM”. “SDRAM” stands for “Synchronous Dynamic Random Access Memory”. SDRAM differs from its predecessor, “DRAM” (Dynamic Random Access Memory) by being synchronized with the clock speed of the CPU. DRAM was asynchronous (not synchronized by any external influence), which “posted a problem in organizing data as it comes in so it can be queued for the process it’s associated with”. SDRAM was able to transfer data one time per clock cycle, and it’s replacement in the early 2000s, “DDR SDRAM” (Dual Data Rate Synchronous Dynamic Random Access Memory) was able to transfer data two times per clock cycle. This evolution of ram would continue to this day. In 2003, DDR2 SDRAM was released, able to transfer four pieces of data per clock cycle. In 2007, DDR3 SDRAM was able to transfer eight pieces of data per clock cycle. In 2014, DDR4 SDRAM still was able to transfer eight pieces of data per cycle, but the clock speed had increased by 600 MHz, and the overall power consumption had been reduced from 3.3 volts for the original SDRAM to 1.2 volts for DDR4. (Thornton)The digital size of each “ram stick” (a physical stick of ram that you would insert into your computer) had also increased, from around two megabytes per stick, to up to 128 gigabytes per stick (although this particular option will cost you around $1,000 per stick depending on the manufacturer) in 2020, although the average stick size is 8 gigabytes. For the average computer nowadays, you can insert up to four ram sticks, although for more high-end systems, you can insert up to sixteen or even thirty-two! Rewind back to 1993, where the original “DooM” took up two megabytes of storage, not to be confused with ram. According to tech enthusiast Rex Farrance in their article “Timeline: 50 Years of Hard Drives”, the average computer at this time had around two gigabytes of storage. Storage took the form of magnetic-optical discs, a combination of the previous magnetic discs and optical discs. (Farrance) This format of storage is still in use today, although mainly for large amounts of rarely used data, while data that is commonly used by programs (including the operating system) is put on solid-state drives, or SSDs. According to tech journalist Keith Foote in their article “A Brief History of Data Storage”, SSDs differed from the HDD by being much faster and smaller, storing data on a flash memory chip, not unlike a USB thumb drive. While SSDs had been used as far back as 1950, they wouldn’t find their way into the average gaming machine until the early 2010s. (Foote) A way to think about SSDs is common knowledge. It doesn’t contain every piece of information you know, it just contains what you use on a daily basis. For example, my computer has around 750 gigabytes of storage in SSDs, and around two terabytes of internal HDD storage. On my SSDs, I have my operating system, my favorite programs and games, and any files that I use frequently. On my HDD, I have everything else that I don’t use on a regular basis.
“DOOM: Eternal” would release on March 20, 2020, four months after it’s original release date on November 22, 2019. And let me tell you, I was excited. The second my clock turned from 11:59 P.M. to 12:00 A.M., I repeatedly clicked my refresh button, desperately waiting to see the words “Coming March 20” transform into the ever so beautiful and elegant phrase: “Download Now”. At this point in time, I had a monitor that was capable of displaying roughly two-million pixels spread out over it’s 27 inch display panel, at a rate of 240 times a second. Speaking of monitors and displays, according to the article “The Evolution of the Monitor” on the website PCR, at the time of the original “DooM” release, the average monitor was either a CRT (cathode ray tube) monitor, or the newer (and more expensive) LCD (liquid crystal display) monitor. The CRT monitor was first unveiled in 1897 by the German physicist Karl Ferdinand Braun. CRT monitors functioned by colored cathode ray tubes generating an image on a phosphorescent screen. These monitors would have an average resolution of 800 by 600 pixels and a refresh rate of around 30 frames per second. CRT monitors would eventually be replaced by LCD monitors in the late 2000s. LCD monitors functioned by using two pieces of polarized glass with liquid crystal between them. A backlight would shine through the first piece of polarized glass (also known as substrate). Electrical currents would then cause the liquid crystals to adjust how much light passes through to the second substrate, which creates the images that are displayed. (The Evolution of the Monitor) The average resolution would increase to 1920x1080 pixels and the refresh rate would increase to 60 frames a second around 2010. Nowadays, there are high end monitors that are capable of displaying up to 7,680 by 4,320 pixels, and also monitors that are capable of displaying up to 360 frames per second, assuming you have around $1,000 lying around.
At long last, it had finished. My 40.02 gigabyte download of “DOOM: Eternal” had finally completed, and oh boy, I was ready to experience this. I ran over to my computer, my beautiful creation sporting 32 gigs of DDR4 ram, an AMD Ryzen 7 “3800x” with a base clock of 3.8 GHz, an Nvidia 2080ti, 750 gigabytes of SSD storage and two terabytes of HDD storage. Finally, after two years of waiting for this, I grabbed my mouse, and moved my cursor over that gorgeous button titled “Launch DOOM: Eternal”. Thanks to multiple advancements in the speed of CPUs, the size of ram and storage, and display resolution and refresh rate, “DooM” had evolved from an archaic, pixelated video game in 1993 into the beautiful, realistic and smooth video game it is today. And personally, I can’t wait to see what the future has in store for us.
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Star Citizen at Max with ~$2000 budget [US/Newegg]

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Games and Me: A Sad Love Story

Greetings all. I'm new here and this is my new throwaway account for this subreddit. I don't want my identity compromised. I'm still not even sure what's going on, but I feel a need to post.
I definitely have addiction problems in nearly every area of life; one could say that I become infatuated/obsessed with things that I'm interested in, very often to an unhealthy degree. Obsession began, strangely enough, with my mother, as I remember bursting through glass windows on a door to get to her in a temper tantrum at the age of four. The only emotion running through my mind at the time was sheer terror. She would leave me here alone?
I've always been told I was "smart", "talented", etc. Focusing on math, science, music, writing, etc came naturally to me, but when faced with an insurmountable problem I often just quit or ignored it. Keep this in mind, as I'll be referring to it later on.
Act I: The Beginning
One of my very earliest memories playing a game and enjoying it (well, no - more like having a complete inability to stop thinking about it, even when not playing) was The Legend of Zelda for NES. Those 8-bit sprites are burned into my brain so perfectly I may have visions of them on my deathbed. I was three when I first played it, and six or seven when I first beat the game. It was quite the landmark. I would go on to complete countless games in life; NES, SNES, N64, PSX, PS2, XBox, NGC, and Wii, for the most part, with PC Gaming as a staple throughout the entire spectrum. One might say I'm such a video game expert that I can't even be bothered to write reviews on a website and monetize this hobby.
The parents put time restrictions on my video game habits as a kid, as any good parent would, and I feel that this helped me stay afloat with my problem immensely. However, like any true addict, once I had Pokemon on my Gameboy, it didn't really matter, I'd just do double- or triple-time and they wouldn't notice. "Going outside to get some fresh air" was never more fun when you're busy lovingly leveling your OP Blastoise to 100 to whoop kids your age at the public library. sigh I did still play with sticks in the forest, but it would always devolve into some maniacal video-game-inspired imaginative storyline. I was most often alone, and had some issues understanding friendship.
As I got into 6th grade, I came across "true" RPGs when a friend let me borrow them. Final Fantasy 6 (III in US) and Chrono Trigger were the big ones. I've wanted to be a part of these stories for a very long time, and I spent hours and hours grinding every goddamn character in FF6 to level 99. Later on, this branched out into RTS games, like the WarCraft/StarCraft series and Red Alert, with almost everything in between.
Finally, I hit 9th grade. This is an important time in one's life. Basically, who you hang out with in HS determines your motivation in school, and that affects the classes you take, etc. Luckily, I was in marching band, which was my saving grace...because this was around the time Diablo II was released, which nearly ruined my life.
Act II: The Denial Years
Diablo II brought my grades lower than they've ever been and caused my parents and I to have screaming matches across the house. For me, a B+ was absolutely unheard of. It was the equivalent, in my mind, of an F. I don't get B grades. When the "sticker shock" of the report card came, I was flabbergasted. I tried to change by hanging out with a different lunch table and a different crowd in band - the FPS guys, rather than the RPG guys (lol, yes, I went to an extraordinarily cliquey school). This worked, for the most part. Unreal and Unreal Tournament/2004 were tremendously fun games that didn't drive me to play them when I didn't want to be playing, at least, and it gave me an excuse to hold LAN parties with the boys, which was quite enjoyable.
The grades went back up, but the motivation was still half-assed. I had a 3.8 GPA and was ranked ~50 out of 300. We had an experimental program where you could take "college" or "honors" courses to get a 4.25 GPA, so mine wasn't actually "that" good. There was an odd surge of extremely intelligent people in my class. Most of those ahead of me didn't play video games at all, however. I thought I was on top of the world, because I had the "best of both worlds" mentality. Little did I know, many of highbrow-sport "jocks" were often the ones with even higher grades and therefore even brighter futures.
When I got to college, I tried the WoW Beta and I instantly knew that it was designed purely as a "carrot dangling in front of the donkey" type of game. The monthly fee was the real reason for it, though. I wanted nothing to do with a company that put money in front of fun. Most of my friends played WoW; I basically played everything else, like Final Fantasy 10, Halo 2 and 3 (always with friends), CS: Source, Half Life 1/2, and more UT2k4. I convinced myself that I wasn't addicted, because I wasn't paying. Of course, I thought - addiction is only when you're stupid about it, right? I was still being stupid with my usage of time, though.
Act III: Closer to Home
The last few years of my life have been very rough. My girlfriend has stayed with me, though I've essentially been a jobless, purposeless, gaming loser. Over the last year or so I've had a helpdesk job in IT that pays around 40k, and I have a four-year B.A. in Computer Information Systems (programming and management, mostly), so it doesn't look too bad from here on out - I've managed to escape the public's perception of me as far as being an entertainment-focused hippy weirdo. That's probably because most people that work in this building are addicted to TV, or some other form of media, themselves.
None of this matters. What matters is today: now.
Today, I am nearly fanatical about my diet, and I've been working out for over a month consecutively (every other day, strength training and cardio), but have severe issues facing any moderate-or-higher amount of difficulty in dealing with problems in life unless I'm in a structured environment with competitive peers also interested in truth (read: academia). I know to to build websites and have some basic programming knowledge, but suffer from a habit of procrastination and decision paralysis from a desire of perfection (probably as a result of games, reinforced by some familial norms). I also meditate from time to time and took a Vipassana 10-day retreat which opened my eyes to the world of the self, and all of the demons my mind has crafted to prevent me from reaching my full potential. One of the biggest, last demons to go would have to be games.
I have three computers at home - a netbook, a fileserver, and my main gaming rig which I now use to mine for Bitcoins. It keeps me from playing games, actually, in fear of missing out on profit, haha - funny how those hoarding mechanisms in RPGs have now made me sort of addicted to money, too...
Most of all, I am interested in a (currently nonexistent) career in the "gamification" of school - that is, adding RPG-like hooks to the learning system to get children to be more interested in schoolwork. Is this a bad idea? I really, really don't think so. What has made all of these games so compelling to me? The fusion of entertainment with interaction. I believe, very strongly, that interactive learning is the next evolutionary stage of school. It is how some of us learn the most effectively. There would be less lost potential for everyone due to teachers that can't teach students that have special needs - "ADD/ADHD" or whatever the psychiatric community is labeling it these days to get kids on drugs. These kids just need more interaction in their learning, and they will then have the potential to kick life's ass.
Khan Academy is already employing these methods into their design, and I think what they have done so far is only the very, very beginning. I'm already "addicted" to Khan Academy's new badge and achievement system - but it's super-fun and healthy!
I'm still playing games, but I'm scared for Diablo III - several friends have expressed a very strong interest in it, and it's only about a month away now. Should I just quit games altogether? I have like $2000 into my Steam account, too, but my playtime per week is usually pretty low in the summertime. I'm just not sure if this is something I'm actually growing out of or if games have just generally gotten more mediocre overall. Otherwise, it could just be the wave of addiction passing for a bit before it comes back.
TLDR: I feel that games, or rather, my obsession with them, has obliterated my life's potential (scientific progress, for the most part) until now. I'm taking steps to correct it, but I'm still unsure if I'll ever be able to stop.
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[Table] IAmA Ubuntu Community Manager at Canonical, author/speaker on Community Management and best practice, and play in metal band Severed Fifth

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Date: 2012-06-05
Link to submission (Has self-text)
Link to my post
Questions Answers
Not sure if any of this is really your job descriptions, but they're the questions I have about Ubuntu anyway. I believe the criticism around Unity could be divided into two broad categories (1) fear of change and (2) critcism about the design/stability of Unity. Back when we originally released Unity into Ubuntu, there was a lot of (1) and some (2). With Ubuntu 12.04 there is a little (1) and not much (2). Unity in 12.04 is significantly faster, better designed, and better executed and I most of the responses I have seen to 12.04 have been praising Unity.
How are you and the rest of Canonical dealing with all of the criticisms of Unity? How are you and the rest of Canonical dealing with all of the criticisms of Unity?
What's the process of implementing Ubuntu for Android like? What do you expect the response to it to be, and how are device manufacturers responding to it? Is Canonical trying to become the Apple of Linux? What other strategies are you implementing to help Linux go mainstream? In terms of fear of change, there will always be some folks who don't like it: that is fine; we have many wonderful options for desktops in Ubuntu. Some folks though feel like we are "dumbing down Linux"; I thoroughly disagree with that notion. Linux should be for everyone, not just Linux geeks, and we want Ubuntu to bring Free Software to everyone, not just a fiefdom populated by those with significant technical skills. What's the process of implementing Ubuntu for Android like? What do you expect the response to it to be, and how are device manufacturers responding to it? Is Canonical trying to become the Apple of Linux? What other strategies are you implementing to help Linux go mainstream?
Can we please get an easier RAID implementation on the desktop flavor Ubuntu? Can we please get an easier RAID implementation on the desktop flavor Ubuntu?
I believe the criticism around Unity could be divided into two broad categories (1) fear of change and (2) critcism about the design/stability of Unity. "I fear Canonical hasn't been listening to the specific concerns of its community when it comes to Unity in particular. It's not that I'm afraid of change, or that it's unstable, it's that it's ugly, unwieldy to use, and non-configurable. The lack of control and configuration coupled with the fact it's been forced down our throats is what really seems to irk the community".
Some folks though feel like we are "dumbing down Linux"; I thoroughly disagree with that notion. Linux should be for everyone, not just Linux geeks. Also, nothing has been "forced down your throat": this is Free Software and you are free to use something else.
Ubuntu, as it stands, is near unusable for a lot of power users who do heavy development work and constantly need to switch applications - and it's 100% because of Unity and "simplifying" the distro. I'll personally be sticking to Debian until this regression goes away. I would consider myself a power user, I am regularly switching applications and it works fine. But here's the thing: this is all personal opinion. It works well for me, perfect! It doesn't work well for you, well you can either help us fix it or use something else. Perfect! Either way, we all get to use Free Software. :-)
Edit: Er, it looks like pseudolobster hit my concern already. Carry on.
Sure, maybe it's time for Ubuntu to move on and try this really ambitious move to dumb down linux for old people, alienating its previous userbase, but it's a damn shame because I used to really like Ubuntu. "Sure, maybe it's time for Ubuntu to move on and try this really ambitious move to dumb down linux for old people, alienating its previous userbase, but it's a damn shame because I used to really like Ubuntu". I always hate to see the term "dumbing down" because it is exclusionary: Ubuntu is for everyone...not just for people with a certain level of expertise. The difference is...for a novice user, they require simple defaults otherwise we lose them, a more technically savvy can dive below the surface and install additional configurability.
Are you still actively trying to push Ubuntu to Android manufacturers/developers? If so, have any responded with any interest? Yes, the convergent device (Ubuntu on Android) is a key area of focus. Canonical engineers have been continuing to build it out and our business team has been working with various handset makers to sign agreements. I believe there are a few deals underway.
Also, any chance that private developers (Cyanogenmod/MIUI/AOKP/AOSP) will get a chance to bake Ubuntu into custom ROMs? As for people taking it and baking it into custom ROMs, I don't see why this couldn't happen in the future. It is unlikely to be one of our standard releases as most people don't install new OSs on their phones, but I am sure the software will be available for integration some time.
You know me in real life, although not by this username. I install a new OS on my phone regularly...so, you know at least one. ;-) Hrm... :-)
How did the Humble Bundle thing go? We're they/Ubuntu receptive and it all went smoothly? Any chance of getting the back catalog into the software center? The Humble Indie Bundle release has gone really well. We had nearly 10000 downloads in 72 hours, and the downloads are continuing. A number of previous games are in the Ubuntu Software Center and we are working on others too.
Also any chance to standardizing a set of libraries for game development in Ubuntu, kind of like what ya'll did for Gtk apps and Quickly? As for Quickly and game development: I would love to see that, we just need a community member to contribute to this. If you (or someone else) wants to help, I would be happy to help you get connected to the right person.
Does this mean that you plan to allow us to link games from previous bundles that are in the software center to our account? I would like to be able to link my purchase of World of Good, Braid, Bittrip runner, and probably othes so that I can more easily download and install them. I think that would be the optimal option.
On a non "I h8 unity" tangent, gaming (and Netflix, to an extent) is a big part of the reason I'm still on Windows some of the time. Are you excited that Steam is coming to Linux? What are the major hurdles, in your opinion, to a better gaming experience on Linux? I am stoked about Steam coming to Linux. The challenge will be hardware support for some graphics cards (most work great), but I suspect that Steam on Linux will apply pressure to the card makers.
What do you see as the future of the music industry? Big, professional, signed artists with major labels.
Newer artists with smaller labels, still probably working part time.
For the big artists, the traditional music industry (make music, sell it, go on tour, sell overpriced merch and tickets etc) works well. This is because for these artists the music companies work like VCs: they put lots of money into different projects and every so often they get a Justin Bieber.
For smaller artists, they are typically working with small labels with barely any marketing budget. This means they sign their value (their music) to a label who often doesn't have the resources to bring the artist up to a higher level.
I believe that for smaller artists, the Creative Commons is the way to go. We did this with Severed Fifth: we grew a community, raised $5000 in funding to record our album, and gave it away for free so others can use it. Our music has appeared in all kinds of music videos on YouTube, in games and elsewhere.
The challenge is for smaller artists who work full time on their music. For weekend warriors like me, money is not that of a deal as I have a job, so giving music away for free is fine. If you are relying on getting paid at a show and need to sell that merch, giving away your music is a big deal, so I understand how some folks are resistant to it.
What type of communication is there between Ubuntu/Canonical and the major PC game developers in regards to promoting more native Linux/.deb version of games? We have a team of people at Canonical who are regularly reaching out to games publishers (e.g. EA) to encourage them to bring their technology to Ubuntu.
I want to develop Free Software and make money out of it. What business models do you suggest so that it can be profitable ? Here are a few models I can think of : make the source available but sell the packaged program ; make the software rely on a service that is not free ; donations ; create closed-source add-ons ; etc. What are your ideas about it, Jono ? Sell it in the Ubuntu Software Center.
Have a donations page on your website.
Sell additional services or materials such as training books, audiobooks, etc.
I think this could make the good stuff happen. :-)
I've been interested in implementing an open source alternative to high end audio studio's software. Has there been any dialog with big publishers (like Steinberg, Avid, Propellerhead, etc) about getting their DAWs crossed over to Linux? Is there any open source project related to audio that has been getting your attention?
Do you see Ubuntu and open software making their move into professional studios? Do you see Ubuntu and open software making their move into professional studios?
Is there any kind of obstacles that open source audio development has faced these this last decade? Is there any open source project related to audio that has been getting your attention? Is there any kind of obstacles that open source audio development has faced these this last decade?
Has there been any dialog with big publishers (like Steinberg, Avid, Propellerhead, etc) about getting their DAWs crossed over to Linux?
Thank you for the answer. :D May the Linux desktop live long and prosper. :) Live long and prosper! :-)
Want to sort me out a summer intern position in your London office? What's that, you do? You're too kind. I am not currently taking any interns. Sorry!
What would be in your opinion the improvements Ubuntu brings to the table compared to other OS (Windows, Mac OS or even Android). Better range of pre-installed software for most users.
What Linux distribution are you running? (Ubuntu?) Secure and virus free experience.
Do you think that major companies feel threatened/insecure with open software, and that is why ATI/nVidia are reluctant to release the libraries for Linux? (at least this was a pain in the ass when I tryed getting the right drivers for my video and sound cards) Free and open, and with a commitment to five years of free security updates for LTSs.
What is your favourite game from the range 2010~2012? Sleek, simple, and elegant user experience.
What is your favorite pokemon? Passionate and friendly community.
Wide range of software in the Ubuntu Software Center.
Strong developer platform.
Etc....
Ubuntu 12.04 for another few weeks until I upgrade to 12.10dev.
I don't think they fear it, I think they just can't justify the investment until they feel the market is bigger.
Not really sure, I am not really a big gamer. :-)
I am not into Pokemon. :-)
Hello, I currently have a home Ubuntu 10.04 server, and I use Lubuntu 12.04 on my Desktop, love them both. I think flavors and derivatives are awesome, and we are very supportive of them. Part of the reason we divide up Ubuntu engineering into Kernel, Foundations, and Desktop is to ensure that the Kernel and Foundations output can be useful for flavors and derivatives too.
I am wondering about what you think about all of the distros that are based on Ubuntu, such as Mint and Pinguy. Does it annoy you that people are moving over to these Ubuntu spinoff's? Or is this just something you expect due to working in the linux community? Our goal here is to build a powerful Free Software platform, and encouraging others to create flavors and derivs is a great feature in building that platform.
What does your job entail as a Community Manager? What does your job entail as a Community Manager? My job is divided into a few different areas. Firstly I build strategy around where we need to build growth and focus on our community (e.g. most recently a strong strategic focus is app developers). Secondly, I manage a team of five community managers who work on different areas (Daniel Holbach (developers), David Planella (app devs / translations), Jorge Castro (cloud), Michael Hall (app devs and upstreams), and Nicholas Skaggs (QA)). Thirdly, I work to ensure Canonical staff members are working with the community and that the values and needs of the community are well served. Finally, I work directly with the community to resolve issues, focus on certain areas, and respond to questions from the community and press.
How often/how long do you spend doing things related to your job? How often/how long do you spend doing things related to your job?
What are your top 5 favourite bands? What are your top 5 favourite bands?
canonical seems to have plowed its own furrow in a number of places: it adopted bzr, then git owned the world. It developed launchpad, but everyone went to github. It threw its lot in with eucalyptus, and then jumped horse to openstack. These examples, upstart, storm, etc. - in general, the open source contributions canonical makes tend to be less than successful compared with other companies. is it bad at managing open source projects, or just bad at marketing them? Each of the technologies you highlighted have been successful, but not neccessarily the most popular. In technology I don't think popularity neccessarily means success. As an example, bzr serves our community really well, so does Launchpad, but I agree it has seen limited wider success. I think Canonical manages Open Source projects well...Ubuntu has been very successful, but I think it boils down to what people want...people want Ubuntu, but in many cases people want git instead of bzr.
i think a few years ago, shuttleworth was saying that canonical was not yet breaking even, but would do - by 2008, then 2010. since then it has started even more projects, in even more markets, hired even more people - presumably that goal is still a ways away. do you look forward to the day when canonical doesn't need to rely on largesse? I am glad we are continuing to invest: we have big, hairy, goals. To achieve them we need growth, focus, and strong teams, and I think we have these. We will break even, but this is a game that needs a lot of upfront investment and passionate people.
Will there be a Bitcoin wallet provided in the Software Center soon? If someone submits it for inclusion then yes! :-)
If anyone is reading this and they have made a wallet, find out how to submit it at Link to developer.ubuntu.com
What's your favorite app in the Software Center? My fave app is the GIMP.
Have you ever met Mark Shuttleworth? Indeed, he was over at my house for a BBQ a few weeks ago.
How is he? I have worked with him since I joined Canonical. He is a cool guy, very technically savvy, with a strong vision, and a strong loyalty to people who are loyal to him. He is very passionate about the community and sits on our Community Council and Technical Board and often gets involved in community matters.
Have you ever negotiated with Valve for bringing steam to Ubuntu/Linux? There has been some discussions.
Any chance of another LugRadio reunion show anytime soon? I've re-played the Devil's Drink segment about a hundred times, still always manages to make me laugh. I would love to do another LugRadio show. We just need to figure out a way of getting the team together, which mainly involved me getting to England to record a show. Maybe we could try a G+ thing sometime. :-)
The accomplishments system is a pretty cool play on the gameification theme, but it is very Ubuntu based. Is there a plan for supporting accomplishments that are totally unrelated to Ubuntu and computing? Absolutely! Right now it is very Ubuntu centric as we are building for what we know, but the system supports accomplishments from other projects too. If someone wants to build an Accomplishments Collection for Fedora, FreeBSD, or whatever, the system supports it. You can read more about creating accomplishments at Link to wiki.ubuntu.com
The only piece of the core system that is very Ubuntu specific is that it uses Ubuntu One. If someone wants to submit a branch to support other backends we would be happy to review. :-)
Jono, what was the fate of Ubuntu's "Four Horsemen" since you guys hired a fifth member of the team? Are you guys now officially called the Five Horsemen? These are the questions that keep Ubuntu redditors awake at night. We are now the six horsemen. :-)
My Question is if the ubuntu developers are thinking in integrating this feature on future versions of Unity? My Question is if the ubuntu developers are thinking in integrating this feature on future versions of Unity?
I would pay to listen again Lugradio or Shot of Jaq and I don't think I'm the only one. Have you ever thought about making money with a podcast? I would pay to listen again Lugradio or Shot of Jaq and I don't think I'm the only one. Have you ever thought about making money with a podcast?
I guess you would love to see available on the Ubuntu Software Center mainstream popular games even if they have DRM and some other important applications like Photoshop, Autocad and etc... But if we fill the desktop with a lot of these things at the end what would be the difference between an Ubuntu desktop and a OSX desktop? Don't you think that open source should create open alternatives and try a different approach? I guess you would love to see available on the Ubuntu Software Center mainstream popular games even if they have DRM and some other important applications like Photoshop, Autocad and etc... But if we fill the desktop with a lot of these things at the end what would be the difference between an Ubuntu desktop and a OSX desktop? Don't you think that open source should create open alternatives and try a different approach?
Lets try again. Unity had terrible reviews. Why did Canonical not listen to their users about the introduction of this? You have to admit, it was a pretty bad reception. Canonical's response to this was similar to RIM's response about poor innovation, or the complete lack of it. They ignored it. That's better, thanks for presenting your question more politely.
When we introduced Unity we knew that chunks of it needed more sheening and refinement. What was important to us was to ensure that Unity was in good shape for Ubuntu 12.04, our next LTS, this is why we dropped in a few releases early to give our users a chance to play with it, share their experiences, share their concerns, and give us a chance to fix these outstanding problems.
Now, as you say, some folks were not happy with Unity. I think part of this was that those early Unity releases has a pretty tiny amount of QA applied: they were crashy, and when Unity crashed, it would take compiz down with it too. To remedy this we built an automated testing lab, and hired someone on my team to build a community of manual testers. I think most would agree that the Unity in 12.04 is much higher quality.
When we introduced Unity originally some folks just didn't like the design. This is always tough: design is emotional, and so is change, so a change with a new design is really emotional. Now some of the feedback at this time was constructive: it highlighted specific deficiencies in the design, problems in the implementation and other things. The design and engineering teams read all of this feedback with interest and reacted to much of it in future releases.
Some folks just didn't like Unity for the fact it was "different" and "why didn't you guys just keep shipping GNOME 2". For us to bring Free Software to more and more people we need to constantly evolve, and Unity was a step along that evolution. We have expanded our target demographic to not just Linux enthusiasts but general consumers too, and we found that GNOME 2 did not serve general consumers as well...as such Unity was designed to bridge that gap.
Now, of course, Unity is not perfect. There is still lots of work to be done, and many improvements to be made, but I think we are on the right track.
One thing I can assure you is that Canonical did not ignore this feedback: quite the opposite, but we did focus on the constructive feedback as opposed to the rantings on social media networks. Ubuntu is a shared project, our community is an integral part of the project, but we have to have a platform of respect and collaboration to do good work...and this is why we focused on the feedback from those who wanted to engage as opposed to yell.
I hope this answers your question. :-)
It's closely related to my major and my career plans, so I'm really curious what goes into it and what kind of surprises I might find myself confronting down the road. I think many new community managers don't build enough strategy into the plans. They have generalized plans around "growth" and "awareness". If you are working professionally for a company, this lack of meat on the bone doesn't give the company or the community enough assurances around the work.
Do you have someone on your team that is focussed on the business desktop users community? Today, not really. Our primary focus is on the collaborative contributor community. This is changing as we focus more and more on user communities (e.g. the app dev community who only want to use Ubuntu as a platform).
2) For those of us looking to contribute to Ubuntu (that have not done so in the past) what areas is the OS lacking, or what areas could we best contribute our skills? I think we need more and more folks helping with LoCo Teams (Link to loco.ubuntu.com and Documentation. We could always use hands on deck there!
Will we ever be able to run DRM protected Silverlight apps like Netflix, or SkyGo? It's pretty much the only thing I can't do on Ubuntu. I would love if we could have Netflix, but it depends on if Netflix are willing to make a Linux client.
I feel you're making a really big mistake here: Pursuing a new demographic while ignoring your core. We are not ignore Linux enthusiasts...we are just not focusing purely on them. Some people presume that just because we don't have everything that a Linux enthusiast needs we are "ignoring" them. We want to build a system for everyone, and that requires a delicate balance.
As I said earlier, for a novice user if we include too much configurabilty that doesn't make sense or is not properly designed, user testing shows that it makes Ubuntu less useful. Technically savvy people can install and add additional configurability where desired. This is why I think it is better to have a simple Unity by default and then allow people to tune and tweak it with additional tools like MyUnity where needed. This way you get the best of both worlds: a simple out of the box experience, yet Linux enthusiasts can hotrod their system to get more if they want.
Any chance of another album any soon? Also, just wanted so say thanks for all the work you in the band and the Ubuntu community. We are currently writing a new Severed Fifth album. I am also thinking of recording an acoustic album for charity.
What can we expect for the future of raspberry pi and ubuntu? I am not really sure. I have not been particularly involved in the discussions with the Raspberry Pi folks: I would love to see Ubuntu running on there.
As a Python developer I would like to ask how the Python 3 integration as the standard version with the next release (12.10) is going? Also, thanks for Ubuntu, just love it for work and personal use and Unity makes it all a joy now. :) To be honest, I am not sure how the Python 3 has progressed thus far...I know it is a core release goal, so it should go pretty well. :-)
Tits or ass? You said any question.... I like all animals, not just Blue Tits and Donkeys.
As a English Ex-Pat Do you have things other than BBQ'ing you are trying to get into the swing of? Perhaps home brewing? I would love to brew some beer. I worry about creating an ultra-death-brew though and losing a weekend. :-)
Is Canonical accepting interns at all, and if so how can I get to know more? Is Canonical accepting interns at all, and if so how can I get to know more?
Aren't you heartily sick of every public discussion you take part in getting hijacked by the small, but excessively vocal, minority of people of just can't deal with people doing some actual work to try and improve the Linux desktop experience (i.e Unity) and prepared to do anything active about their own problems? Aren't you heartily sick of every public discussion you take part in getting hijacked by the small, but excessively vocal, minority of people of just can't deal with people doing some actual work to try and improve the Linux desktop experience (i.e Unity) and prepared to do anything active about their own problems? There is definitely a vocal minority, but my take on this has been that every opinion and critique is fair so long as it is respectful, accurate, and preferably in the interests of finding a solution. Some folks have tried Ubuntu 12.04 and still don't like Unity and have a list of reasons why, and they fairly and respectfully share those views: that kind of discourse is wonderful...it helps us improve.
Did you pick the band for UDS-Q? They were awesome. Did you pick the band for UDS-Q? They were awesome.
Unity from a year ago ... ignore these people. If Unity a year ago was so bad that you're ignoring the early adopters who got burned by it, why on earth did you let it out the door? Why should they trust you now? Software is never "done", you have to release early and release often; that is at the core of how Open Source works.
"Unity" means − among other things − "the same interface for Desktops, TV, phones, tablets, cars". Have you put any thoughts in Home Automation interfaces, which I think can become a big thing in the future ? While not a core focus of the Unity team right now, I would love to see a community derivative Ubuntu distribution for home automation. I think it could be awesome. :-)
What advice can you give to someone who is new to the field of Community Management? Without wishing to push my book, I think it will be helpful for you. Just make sure you get the new 2nd Edition: there is lots of other good content in there.
My advice for getting started is to study the work of other community managers, and listen and learn from their experience. Community management is a skill that is passed on between different people, and that kind of observational work is useful in seeing patterns and approaches to the profession.
Is the 2nd edition available as an e-book? Yep! :-)
Will you be dressing up as a spherical cow for halloween? Because I'm having a damned hard time finding a quetzal costume. Srsly. :) LOL! I hope so!
Will you be coming to Ground Kontrol after the Puppet Labs party this year, and if so, will we have to physically carry you back across the river? You don't have a keynote this year, so no excuses. :P. I can try. :-)
Any plans to provide funding/grants to the LoCo teams to help them organize events or for doing what they do? Outside of our current funding, I am not sure we will be able to commit to further funding. What I would love to see is LoCo Teams supporting themselves more and more with Kickstarter campaigns and donations drives to help cover any other expenses. :-)
Are there any plans to introduce the minimizing of apps by clicking or holding their icon in the launcher? What is wrong with the minimize button? :-)
Also, are there any plans to make the dash more efficient in finding apps, files, music etc.? The design team are constantly working to improve search and findability, and I think you will see some improvements in the 12.10 cycle in this area.
Hi, recently I bought a samsung series 5 ultrabook and tried to install ubuntu on it. I discovered I couldn't. Is this some king of boycott or the problem is me? Greetings from Brazil. No idea: it should install fine. Was there a software error?
Checked to make sure you had a beard. Not disappointed. LOL!
'Did my first parachute jump' is exactly the sort of thing I was aiming at with the question, human verified accomplishements, perhaps with geo-tagged photo proof. Part of the original plan was to have human-awarded accomplishments. The classic use case we have here is something such as an Ubuntu contributor wanting to thank someone for some great work that cannot be auto-detected with the current system. We would give them the ability to award a trophy to this person so it appears in their My Trophies view.
For your parachute jump example, we could potentially set up a system where a set of people can issue trophies when they see proof of something. For example, you send someone a photo of you doing the jump and then they award the trophy.
This would be great for bucket lists (e.g. visiting a set of landmarks) and then getting trophies for each one you visit.
It is all possible, we just need more hands on deck to write the code. :-)
My uncle has ubuntu on his 3rd and 4th computers. I like to call his little son "ubuntu" Lols were had. Awesome!
Last updated: 2012-06-09 23:45 UTC
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